The Power of Awe

      “A dramatic feeling with the power to inspire, heal, change our thinking and bring people together.” This is how “awe” was described in a recent article I read titled “Feeling Awe May Be the Secret to Health and Happiness.” The article discusses how recent studies are showing that “awe” is now thought to be a “basic part of being human that we all need.” It states that there are many ways in which awe affects us, including binding us together, helping us see things in new ways, making us nicer and happier, and altering our bodies.

      This article reminded me of the important impact Above the Clouds is having in the world by changing the lives of children facing all kinds of serious adversity, including for example, those who are ill, underprivileged, at-risk or abused. Most of the kids we get to know have never even been in an airplane let alone been given the opportunity to fly one. This seems like it might be something so insignificant but flying in the co-pilot seat with Above the Clouds makes them realize that we are all a part of something larger. Many of us get caught up in our busy lives and forget to see the forest and not just the trees. When these kids soar high up in the sky they get a new lease on life and a refreshed outlook on their world.

      Awe is “a positive emotion that has been proven to reduce levels of stress, and is a necessary part of being a healthy human being.” Above the Clouds makes awe accessible to kids who feel like they have been forgotten or need to be reminded that they are special. The power of awe doesn’t necessarily have to be something like seeing The Grand Canyon for the first time or meeting Nelson Mandela. Awe can be experienced when you witness a random act of kindness or by giving kids a chance to fly in an airplane. That is the true power of awe.


For the full article click here:



Aviation Day

What an adventure at Norwood Memorial Airport! Above the Clouds welcomed teens from Crossroads4Kids to a day of aviation fun. In addition to learning about aerodynamics, airplane mechanics, airplane safety, running a fixed based operation (small airport) and sitting in and discussing small planes and small jets, the teens got a ride in a flight simulator and visited the Air Traffic Control Tower. Special thanks to everyone who made this possible: Brendan, Lindsay, Radek, Jon Roberts and John McCarthy. Stay tuned for pictures of this exciting day.